Yoga Burn

How does it work?

The secret to the success of the Yoga Burn Program and Build Muscle Today lies in what’s referred to as Dynamic Sequencing. Dynamic Sequencing is the way in which the yoga burn program teaches you how to properly perform each movement and then continues to adapt and increase the challenge at the precise moment your body starts to get used to the routine. This forces your body to change and adapt, which in turn, helps to build a shapely, feminine body that not only looks better, but feels better too! Yoga Burn’s unique 3 phase program guides you through 15 different videos that are laid out in a way that will keep your body and mind guessing to ensure you do not get bored, or hit a plateau. To learn more about Yoga Burn’s unique 3 phase approach to healthy weight loss and body shaping click

Who is Yoga Burn For?

Yoga Burn is for women from any walk of life who are ready to make time to follow a done-for-you yoga program designed to promote natural and healthy weight loss without any need for pills, powders or potions. If you want to lose weight and get in shape without having to spend countless hours in the gym or lift heavy weights and achieve Fat Loss  then Yoga Burn may be a great fit for you.

Can I do Yoga Burn while pregnant?

Yes, you absolutely can. If pregnant, I recommend you take advantage of the bonus videos, The Beginner Flow and The Tranquility Flow, which are ideal throughout all stages of Pregnancy. In addition, we also provide you with a complete list of modifications to be used during each trimester of your pregnancy. And best of all, Yoga Burn is perfect for helping you recover once you’ve had your baby as you can start getting fit without even having to leave the comfort of your own home!

Who is Yoga Burn For?

Yoga Burn is for women from any walk of life who are ready to make time to follow a done-for-you yoga program designed to promote natural and healthy weight loss without any need for pills, powders or potions. If you want to lose weight and get in shape without having to spend countless hours in the gym or lift heavy weights then Yoga Burn may be a great fit for you.

Can I do Yoga Burn while pregnant?

Yes, you absolutely can. If pregnant, I recommend you take advantage of the bonus videos, The Beginner Flow and The Tranquility Flow, which are ideal throughout all stages of Pregnancy. In addition, we also provide you with a complete list of modifications to be used during each trimester of your pregnancy. And best of all, Yoga Burn is perfect for helping you recover once you’ve had your baby as you can start getting fit without even having to leave the comfort of your own home!

What makes Yoga Burn different from yoga classes?

Well, first of all, you won’t have to be stepping over sweaty yoga mats to find a spot in an overpriced and crowded studio, fight through traffic to get to the gym, or deal with men having their heads up your “you know what” just to do the same generic class week in and week out. But, on a more serious note, Yoga Burn is a progressive yoga  program designed exclusively for women to deliver maximum  Burn Fat results and body shaping effects in the shortest amount of time. Remember, each and every strategic movement built into this program was done so with that sole purpose in mind which makes it completely and utterly unique from anything else available period. Yoga Burn is designed  specifically to meet the needs and challenges of everyday women that want to shape up, lose weight and experience all of the amazing benefits a professional and progressive yoga program has to offer… All in the comfort of your own home… On your own time.

Although most people think of yoga as just increasing your flexibility, it can do much more than that.

Yoga can be used to increase strength in all areas of your body. Certain poses you do will cause you to burn and work your muscles more than you ever thought.

8 Minute Yoga Burn

There are yoga sequences out there that will cause you to feel sore the next day. This isn’t surprising.

Yoga works your muscles much more than people think it does when they first begin.

You don’t have to an expert for the following yoga routine, but some moves may be difficult for those that aren’t that flexible.

Here is the 8 minute routine:

  • Chair Pose – 1 minute
  • Goddess Pose – 1 minute
  • Knee to Tricep Plank (right) – 30 seconds
  • Knee to Tricep Plank (left) – 30 seconds
  • Side Plank (right) – 30 seconds
  • Side Plank (left) – 30 seconds
  • Four Limbed Staff Pose – 1 minute
  • Extended Locust – 1 minute
  • Boat Pose – 1 minute
  • Wheel Pose – 1 minute

When it comes to these poses, as it does with any pose you do in yoga, it’s important to do them as properly as you can. You may not be able to sink into the stretch fully, but when you try to overstretch yourself and push yourself too far beyond your limits, that’s when injuries start to happen.

If you find yourself struggling with some of these poses, make sure you breathe properly. Doing this is going to relax your body and allow you to do the poses much easier.

Chair Pose

Chair pose is going to engage all the muscles on the lower half of your body.

You’ll be working your glutes, hastrings, and quads. Toning the muscles in your legs while giving your shoulders some work as well is a great benefit of this pose.

Goddess Pose

You don’t have to be a woman to do this pose. Goddess is just the name of the pose.

Once again, you will be engaging and feeling the burn in the lower half of your body. Holding this position requires you to have a lot of strength in your hamstrings so prepare to have these burn a lot.

Knee To Tricep Plank

This isn’t your traditional plank. Although, it is very similar to that with a slight variation.

Doing this pose will engage your core muscles just like a regular plank. Bringing your knee to your tricep will force you to work on the flexibility of your hips.

Your obliques will be getting a good amount of work as well when your bring your knees forward.

In the video below, you’ll see the man alternating knees to tricep, however, for purposes of this workout, hold the knee at the tricep for a full 30 seconds before switching sides.

Side Plank

Side planks will work on your arm strength and obliques.

This will be the best pose fr your obliques or “love handles.” The burn will happen almost immediately especially if you’ve never done work on your obliques in the past.

Four Limbed Staff Pose

You will be engaging muscles all over your body with this pose.

This pose requires a lot of strength and stability because of how low you have to hold your body.

If you are a beginner then this pose may be much more difficult for you. Don’t worry, though, there are other variations you can do so you can build up to a full four limbed staff pose.

Extended Locust

If you have back problems, you may want to skip this pose.

You’ll be forcing your back and core to do a lot of work with this pose. You will be extending up as high as you can. It can be very easy to hurt your back so proceed with caution.

Boat Pose

Holding this pose really engages your core and when you are able to point your toes, you’ll be engaging muscles from your toes up through your hips.

The more you’re able to straighten your legs, the more you’ll be able to get out of this pose.

Wheel Pose

This pose should not be done if you aren’t flexible enough.

If you struggled with the extended locust, you seriously need to consider not even attempting the wheel pose.

It requires the most flexibility of your back so again, proceed with this pose with caution.

Doing yoga regularly offers many benefits, including making you feel better about your body as you become stronger and more flexible, toning your muscles, reducing stress, and improving your mental and physical well-being. But how can it help you lose weight?

What Yoga Can’t Do

Practicing any type of yoga will build strength, but studies show that yoga does not raise your heart rate enough to make it the only form of exercise you need to shed pounds. In order to lose weight, you must eat healthily and burn calories by doing exercise that raises your heart rate on a regular basis. More vigorous yoga styles can provide a better workout than gentle yoga, but if weight loss is your primary goal, you will want to combine yoga with runningwalking, or any other aerobic exercise that you enjoy. Still, yoga can play an important role in a weight loss program.

What Yoga Can Do

While losing weight can be simplified to a calories in vs. calories out equation, a lot more goes into successfully changing your habits to make healthier choices second nature. Yoga helps by bringing you better in tune with your body, improving your self-image and sense of well-being. Reducing stress and thereby stress eating is another way that yoga can support weight loss. By encouraging a healthy lifestyle, consistent yoga practice makes it more likely that you’ll be able to maintain your weight loss. Perhaps most significantly, yoga’s emphasis on listening to your body first and foremost can be a sea change for people who have struggled to shed pounds in the past. Yoga has an important role to play in a holistic approach to weight loss.

What Kind of Yoga?

If you’ve never done yoga before, be sure to start with beginner level classes. You’ll burn the most calories in athletic vinyasa classes. These styles usually start with a fast-paced series of poses called sun salutations, followed by a flow of standing poses which will keep you moving. Once you are warmed up, deeper stretches and backbends are introduced. Vinyasa includes many popular, sweaty yoga styles, such as:

  • Ashtanga: Ashtanga yoga is a very vigorous style of practice and its practitioners are among the most dedicated of yogis. Beginners are often encouraged to sign up for a series of classes, which will help with motivation. Since Ashtanga follows the same series of poses each time, once you learn the sequence, you can practice anytime at home or join a Mysore-style group, in which there is a teacher present but each student goes at their own pace.
  • Power Yoga: Power yoga is extremely popular at gyms and health clubs, though it is widely available at dedicated yoga studios as well. Power yoga is based on building the heat and intensity of Ashtanga while dispensing with fixed series of poses.
  • Hot Yoga: Vinyasa yoga done in a hot room ups the ante by guaranteeing you’ll sweat buckets. Be aware that Bikram and hot yoga are not synonymous. Bikram is a pioneering style of hot yoga, which includes a set series of poses and, indeed, a script developed by founder Bikram Choudhury. These days, there are many other styles of hot yoga that make use of the hot room but not the Bikram series.

Gentle yoga, while burning fewer calories, is still a great way to nurture and care for your body.

  • Hatha Yoga: While not all Hatha classes are gentle, the term has come to be used by yoga studios to indicate classes that are NOT vinyasa. Ask at your studio or gym.
  • Integral Yoga: Just as the name suggests, Integral is all about integrating the body and mind with the goal of living a happier life. This is an approach that can greatly benefit people who feel dissociated from their bodies.
  • Kripalu Yoga: Kripalu is a style that is known for its open acceptance of all levels of practice and body types. Its individualized approach has made it a top choice for people who are nervous about attending group classes.

Doing Yoga at Home

You can also do yoga at home on the days you can’t make a class. Online yoga video websites make it easy to practice in your own living room. To maximize yoga’s benefits, it’s great to do a little bit each day. Starting a home meditation practice is another. Yoga’s benefits are both mental and physical, making it an integral part of many successful weight loss regimes.

As contemporary life is more and more reliant on non-stop streams of information from our mobile devices and constant stimulation becomes the norm, people crave a way to unplug and give their minds a rest. Meditation offers one way to do this. If you’ve been feeling like you’d like to try meditation but you’re not sure how ​then here’s one basic method to get you started.

What Is Meditation?

For our purposes, let’s define meditation as being attentive to the fluctuations of your mind. Most of the time, we completely identify with our own thoughts, meaning there is no separation between the thoughts and the thinker. Meditation begins to break down this relationship. There are many different schools of meditation, each with its own methodology. The technique of observing your breath described below is based on a Buddhist tradition.

1. Designate a time

Many people like to meditate first thing in the morning, but if some other time of day is better for you, go with that. Just make sure you pick a time when you can consistently devote yourself to this practice. It doesn’t have to be lengthy. Ten or fifteen minutes is a good place to start. If you have a regular yoga routine at home, you can do your meditation at the end.

2. Create the space

In addition to choosing a time, you also need to find a place for your practice. It doesn’t have to be big or have any kind of special decor, but it should be away from household distractions. A corner of your bedroom or living room is perfect. You’ll also need a timer that will sound at the end of your meditation session so that you’re not constantly checking the clock to see how much time is left. Silence your phone so that you’re not tempted to break off your meditation if it rings.

3. Warming Up

You may want to do a little warm-up yoga sequence before sitting, especially if you are going to meditate first thing in the morning. If you find you don’t need to warm up, that’s fine too.

4. How to sit

If you can sit on the floor, have blankets or a cushion to sit on. Meditation cushions called zafus are nice, but definitely not necessary. Try a cross-legged position like sukasana. Most people can not sit for long periods in lotus position and can even injure themselves trying, so avoid that for now. If cross-legged isn’t comfortable, try virasana with a block under your seat. It is often an easier position for your back. If you can’t sit on the floor, that’s fine too. Find a chair where you can sit up straight with both your feet resting flat on the floor.

5. Hand positions

Yo may have seen pictures of people meditating with their hands in various positions called mudras. You can try any position you have seen, but you can also just place your hands in your lap. Another option is to place the hands on your knees with the palms up or down. Find a position that is comfortable for you.

6. What to do

Assume your seat and close your eyes. Begin to observe your breath without changing it. There is a tendency to want to deepen your breathing as soon as you notice it. Resist this urge. Focus all your attention on your inhales and exhales, maybe zeroing in on the sensation of air moving in and out of your nostrils. You can count the breaths if that helps you stay focused on them. When your mind starts to wander, as it inevitably will, notice your thoughts and then release them. You can even picture them floating away before returning your attention to your breathing.

7. How Long

When you first start, set your timer for five minutes. If it’s hard for you to stay attentive to the breath for that length of time, work on that before increasing the duration. When you are ready, begin to add one minute to your sitting time. Slowly work up to ten and then twenty minutes.

8. How to finish

When your timer sounds, open your eyes. Take just a few moments to notice how you feel after your practice. If you are stiff after sitting, slowly move to your hands and knees. A little stretch (a downward-facing dog, for instance) can help you loosen up.

What to Expect From a Hatha Yoga Class

Learn the history of hatha yoga and what present-day classes are like

Hatha is a very broad term that encompasses any of the physical practices of yoga. It can be used to describe every kind of yoga practice from Iyengar to Ashtanga and everything that falls between and beyond. In fact, any of the many contemporary types of physical yoga that are popular today can be accurately described as hatha yoga.

The History of Hatha

Hatha means forceful in Sanskrit, the ancient Indian language that is the source of most of yoga’s terminology. According to Ellen Stansell, a scholar of yogic literature, the term may have come into use as early as the 12th century. Though hatha is considered to be on the gentle end of the spectrum these days, Stansell posits that it must have seemed strong in comparison to more subtle practices (meditation, for example) that were available at the time.

The first Indian gurus who brought yoga to a Western audience in the mid-19th century took pains to distance themselves from hatha yoga, which they associated with wandering street beggars called yogins. In his book “Yoga Body: The Origins of Modern Posture Practice,” Mark Singleton says it wasn’t until the international popularity of the physical culture movement later in the 19th century that hatha yoga was integrated into the teachings exported to the West.

Contemporary Hatha Yoga Classes

Given that the word has such an open meaning, what should you expect if you attend a hatha yoga class? Today, hatha is most often used to describe gentle, basic yoga classes that emphasize static postures compared to styles with more movement or flow. Expect a slower-paced stretching-focused class with some basic breathing exercises (pranayama) and perhaps a seated meditation at the end. Hatha classes are a good place to work on your alignment, learn relaxation techniques, and become comfortable with doing yoga while building strength and flexibility.

Hatha Flow Classes

Just to confuse things, some studios throw something called hatha flow into the mix. Classes in which you move from pose to pose in a sequence without resting can also correctly be described as vinyasa. To further add to the muddle, you might see both hatha flow and vinyasa on the schedule at your local studio. In this case, expect the vinyasa option to be a little more vigorous, but so much depends on the style of each individual teacher that it’s impossible to be definitive on this point without taking specific classes. If you need more clarification, ask the studio how the classes differ or try them yourself to find out.

Is Hatha Yoga for You?

Try a hatha class if the idea of gentle yoga appeals to you or seems right for your body. It can be a great introduction to yoga, but shouldn’t be mistaken for easy yoga since it can still be challenging both physically and mentally.

Hatha classes provide an opportunity to stretch, unwind, and release tension, providing a good counterpoint to both busy lifestyles and cardio workouts. If you go into a hatha class and it feels too slow or not active enough, don’t give up on yoga completely. There are faster-paced, more athletic ways to do yoga. Try a vinyasa or power yoga class, and see if that’s more your speed.

What Is Power Yoga?

Power yoga is a general term used to describe a vigorous, fitness-based approach to vinyasa-style yoga. Though many consider power yoga to be superficial “gym yoga,” this style of yoga practice was originally closely modeled on the Ashtanga method.

Power yoga incorporates the athleticism of Ashtanga, including lots of vinyasas (series of poses done in sequence) but gives each teacher the flexibility to teach any poses in any order, making every class different. With its emphasis on strength and flexibility, power yoga brought yoga into the gyms of America as people began to see yoga as a way to work out.

Who Invented Power Yoga?

The term “power yoga” became popular during the mid-1990s when two American yoga teachers who had studied with Ashtanga guru Sri K. Pattabhi Jois began to make what they had learned more accessible to Western students. They also wanted to move away from the rigid Ashtanga sequence, which is a set series of poses that are always done in the same order.

Bryan Kest, based in Los Angeles, and Beryl Bender Birch, based in New York, are most often credited with the nearly simultaneous invention of power yoga on opposite coasts. Both were part of the second generation of American Ashtanga students; Kest originally learned from David Williams and Bender Birth from yoga guru Norman Allen. Williams and Allen were both among Jois’s first western students. Kest went on to study with Jois in Mysore, India. Bender Birch, who had previously done SivanandaKundalini, and Iyengar yoga, worked with Jois during his trips to the United States in the 1980s.

Kest and Bender Birth both used the term power yoga to differentiate the intense, flowing style of yoga they were teaching from the gentle stretching and meditation based practices that many Americans associated with yoga. Bender Birch has said that when she started calling her classes power yoga, she still taught the Ashtanga sequence of poses.

Some conventional yoga teachers dismiss power yoga as a gimmick that undermines the holistic and spiritual foundations of the classic forms of the practice and places too much stress on physical exercise.

Styles of Power Yoga

Larry Schultz, who studied Ashtanga with Jois beginning in the 1980s, also introduced a form of power yoga at his iconic San Francisco studio, “It’s Yoga,” in the early 1990s. Schultz broke with Jois’s method by mixing together poses from the first three Ashtanga series. Schultz later codified his approach into a style he named “rocket yoga.”

Baron Baptiste is another well-known yoga teacher who has successfully established his own style of power yoga, Baptiste Power Vinyasa. Baptiste had also studied Iyengar and Bikram. Using the non-specific term power yoga gave each of these innovators the freedom to draw methods and poses from all their influences simultaneously to create something new.

Although power yoga classes vary widely from teacher to teacher, you can expect to find some intense flowing yoga with a minimal amount of chanting and meditation. Many gyms and health clubs, in particular, have taken up the term as a way to let their clientele know that this is serious exercise. If you decide to try a power yoga class, prepare to work hard and to work up a sweat.

Health Benefits of Power Yoga

Power yoga enthusiasts say it enhances stamina, flexibility, posture, and mental focus. Like all physical activities, it also relieves tension and releases toxins through sweat. Because it is rigorous, it burns more calories than most traditional forms of yoga and therefore can help with weight loss.

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